Police release photos, say suspected flasher on the loose at Langara College – Vancouver Sun

Vancouver Police say three indecent acts have been reported at Langara College since late March.
Vancouver police have released images of a man in their hunt for a flasher that they allege has been lurking around Langara College, exposing himself to students and staff on campus multiple times in the past month.

In an “unsettling” set of circumstances, Vancouver police Const. Tania Visintin said, “preliminary evidence suggests the same suspect is responsible for all three indecent acts. We’re working to determine if this man is connected to other unsolved cases in Vancouver and neighbouring cities.”

The first incident occurred March 20 when police allege a man exposed his genitals to a student in the library.

A week later, the same person was reported to have flashed his private parts to a staff member at the college. This incident was reported to police, but the man left before cops were notified.

Then on April 19, a man exposed his genitals to a student inside the library, police allege. He left before the police arrived.

In all three incidents, the man was described as being dark-skinned and about 5-foot-5 to 5-foot-7 tall, police said.

Anyone with information is asked to call police at 604-717-0604.

— With files from Cheryl Chan

sgrochowski@postmedia.com

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Mattea Roach: 'Jeopardy!' champ lands 19th win – CTV News

Canadian "Jeopardy!" Hall-of-Famer Mattea Roach is now tied for the sixth longest streak in the TV quiz show’s history.
She’s tied with David Madden and Jason Zuffranieri, who also won 19 games.
The 23-year-old’s winnings total US$460,184 — the sixth biggest haul in the show’s regular-season history.
Roach, who lives in Toronto and was raised in Halifax, has also earned a spot in the show’s tournament of champions, set to air in the fall.
She holds the longest win streak by a Canadian contestant.
One more win would put her in 5th place.
She has also earned a spot in the show’s tournament of champions, set to air in the fall, and holds the longest win streak by a Canadian contestant.
Roach lives in Toronto, but she has said on the show that she spent much of her childhood and part of her adolescence in Halifax, and has also lived in Calgary and Moncton, N.B.
Caitlin Hayes, the North Vancouver resident who competed against Roach on her 10th episode, said she’s having a blast watching her former rival’s impressive run.
"It’s really fun every night to watch and be cheering her on," Hayes said. "She’s so good."
Hayes already knew Roach would be a formidable opponent when she took to the Alex Trebek stage back in February.
The show films five episodes each day, and Hayes had been in the studio audience the previous day.
"So I sat there for, like, 10 hours and watched her play five games in a row. She won all five and she was so good," Hayes said.
The next day, Hayes was called on to compete first thing. After a slow start, she was the only person to get the Final Jeopardy clue right. Unfortunately, she missed out on winning because she didn’t wager enough — something her nine-year-old daughter hasn’t let her forget.
"She’s definitely constantly saying, ‘Mommy should have bet more."’
This report by The Canadian Press was first published April 29, 2022.
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Maple Leafs draw the back-to-back champion Tampa Bay Lightning in round one: A quick look at the matchup – Maple Leafs Hot Stove

PHOTO: DIRK SHADD / TB TIMES
With their victory over Boston in the final game of the regular season, the Maple Leafs will officially face off against the back-to-back Stanley Cup champions in round one as they pursue their first playoff series victory since 2004. The series will start on Monday in Toronto with games to follow every other day from there.
Anthony succinctly summarized the challenge facing the Leafs against Tampa earlier this week:  “They can play any which way, and that’s probably the scariest thing about them. They can win on all levels: special teams, skill, grind-it-out defense, elite goaltending — you name it, they can do it.”
The high-level stat breakdown of the two sides this season:
Based on the 2021-22 season numbers, the Leafs have a slight edge on special teams and in their 5v5 control of shot attempts and expected goals; they have a notable edge in goals for per game at 5v5. The Lightning have a notable edge in 5v5 goals against per game (and in 5v5 save percentage, naturally). It goes without saying that there is also the intangible of the mental edge and vast playoff experience of the Lightning, both behind the bench and amongst the respective core players.
Given the margins are fairly tight across the board, at playoff time, it’s generally the safer bet to go with the more playoff-proven team with the better goaltending / goals against numbers (let alone one that has won b2b Cups, with the best goaltender and best defenseman in the league). That said, it is maybe noteworthy how the two goaltenders ended the regular season: Campbell is 7-0-2 with a .915 save percentage, and Vasilevskiy is 5-4-1 with a .904 save percentage (still, it’s Vasilevskiy and the Stanley Cup playoffs we’re talking about here). More pertinent, the Leafs have allowed slightly fewer expected goals against per 60 at 5v5 over the duration of the season (2.34/60 for the Leafs, 2.38/60 for the Lightning).
The difference in the goals-against numbers is entirely down to netminding: .909 at 5v5 for Toronto (27th in the NHL) vs. .922 for the Lightning (11th in the NHL). As a Leafs fan, that will either make you feel better or worse about the team’s prospects in this series depending on how you trusting you are in Campbell’s current ability (post-midseason meltdown + injury) to stay healthy and shut the door at playoff time, having never seen him experience the grind of a full season followed by a playoff run.
The season series between the two teams was an even split, although the Lightning edged the Leafs on points due to their overtime defeat. We can throw out the extra-time result — there is no three-on-three in the playoffs — and call it a win, a tie, and two losses for the Leafs.  Here is how the numbers broke down in the four-game regular-season series, although you can take it all with a grain of salt.
Again, especially with two blowouts in the mix, it’s foolhardy to read too much into four games with significant gaps in time in between and changed lineups from game to game, but the Leafs significantly outshot the Lightning, won the possession and expected goals battle, were outscored 16-12 over all situations and 10-7 at 5v5, and special teams were a wash. There was a massive gap in save percentage in favour of the Lightning.
Look no further than Jack Campbell as the single biggest X-factor in this series. You have to like the odds of the Leafs, with their up-tempo and dominant puck possession game, to generally control the run of play at 5v5 while creating enough looks offensively (they’re top three in scoring chances/60, xGF/60, high-danger chances/60). A huge part of the Leafs’ chances comes down to just how much Campbell can narrow the major gap on paper between him and the goaltender that posted a .937 with five shutouts over the Lightning’s 23-game championship run last Spring (and is a .932 in 48 playoff games spanning the back-to-back Cup runs).
Knowing the Lightning were holding down second place for a good chunk of the 2021-22 season, you’d think for them to be in this position of starting the playoffs on the road, they would at least be backing into the playoffs. But it’s not the case as the Lighting, after a month and a half of .500 hockey that dropped them into third place in the Atlantic (10-10-2), have rattled off a 7-2-0 run in the past couple of weeks.
Steven Stamkos (33 points in 16 games) and Nikita Kucherov (31 points in 16 games) lead the league in point-scoring this month, and the Lightning scored an eye-popping 46 goals over the aforementioned nine-game stretch. Their power play is also clicking at nearly 33% in April (the Leafs’ is down at 17% this month).
All in all, the nature of the threat posed by Tampa no needs no reminding, and the realities of the Atlantic Division have obviously produced a first-round draw from hell despite a remarkable 115-point season by the Leafs. But in addition to a few of the promising indicators in the underlying numbers, there are some other positive spins we could take on this if we really squint.
The Leafs are going to enter this series generally viewed as underdogs despite holding home-ice advantage; as a team that has folded under the pressure of expectations while entering as clear favourites against Montreal (and arguably Columbus), that might not be the worst thing in the world.
Unlike with Boston, it’s a clean slate with no juju at work in terms of haunting recent playoff history between the franchises, as these two clubs have never played each other in the postseason before.
Dating back to March 1, the Lightning are 17-12-2 to the Leafs’ 19-7-3.
Additionally, the last time we saw a team win back-to-back Cups, it was Pittsburgh in 2016 and 2017, and while they did win a series before bowing out to Washington in 2018, there is the question of how much gas is left in the tank for a Tampa core that went through two championship runs followed by abbreviated offseasons.
We will get into some of the matchup considerations, x-factors, and keys to the series in the days to come, but we’ll leave you with this for now: After a season in which the Leafs did basically everything in their power to put the latest playoff catastrophe behind them and prepare themselves for this series — shattering all manner of franchise records, individually and collectively — we are about to find out really fast if they’ve eradicated the demons (from under their beds, in their cars, f*** everywhere!) and are truly Cup-contention worthy.

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Zelensky says peace talks close to collapse as battle rages in the east – The Globe and Mail

Residents carry their belongings as they leave their damaged building following Russian strikes in Kyiv, Ukraine, on April 29, 2022.SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP/Getty Images
Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said on Friday there was a high risk that peace talks with Moscow would end and U.S. lawmakers pledged to move fast on a plan to send as much as US$33-billion to help Kyiv keep fighting Russia’s assault.
UN Secretary-General António Guterres had said during a visit to Kyiv on Thursday that intense discussions were under way to evacuate civilians from the steel works in Mariupol, which is under heavy Russian attack as part of an offensive in the south and east.
One of the fighters holed up in the city, a major target of Russia’s invasion, told Reuters the comments gave him hope hundreds of civilians blocked with them at the plant for weeks would be evacuated after many failed attempts.
Mr. Zelensky’s office had said an operation was planned to get civilians out of the plant on Friday but there was no sign of an evacuation as dusk fell. He later expressed pessimism over the prospect of continued peace talks with Russia, blaming public anger with what he said were atrocities by Russian troops.
“People (Ukrainians) want to kill them. When that kind of attitude exists, it’s hard to talk about things,” Interfax quoted him as telling Polish journalists.
Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov accused Kyiv of changing its position under what he said were orders from the United States and Britain.
Mr. Zelensky praised the offer of help made by U.S. President Joe Biden on Thursday, which amounts to nearly 10 times the aid Washington has sent so far since the invasion started on Feb. 24. Moscow calls the war a special military operation.
U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Nancy Pelosi said lawmakers hoped to pass the US$33-billion aid package “as soon as possible.”
Having failed in an assault on Kyiv in the north of Ukraine last month, Russia is now trying to fully capture two eastern provinces known as Donbas.
Ukraine has acknowledged losing control of some towns and villages there since the assault began last week, but says Moscow’s gains have come at a massive cost to a Russian force already worn down from its earlier defeat near the capital.
“We have serious losses but the Russians’ losses are much bigger … They have colossal losses,” presidential adviser Oleksiy Arestovych said, without elaborating.
Western officials said Russia had been suffering fewer casualties after narrowing the scale of its invasion but numbers were still “quite high,” while the British defence ministry said Russian gains had been limited and came at “significant cost.”
Ukrainian officials said Russia was pounding the whole front line in the eastern Donetsk region with rockets, artillery, mortar bombs and aircraft to stop the Ukrainians regrouping, but a U.S. official said the offensive seemed to be behind schedule.
Of southern Ukraine, the Ukrainian military said the Russians were “continuing to regroup, increase fire effectiveness and improve positions.”
By pledging tens of billions of dollars in aid for Ukraine, Mr. Biden has dramatically increased U.S. involvement in the conflict.
The United States and its allies are now sending heavy weapons including artillery, with what Washington says is an aim not just to repel Russia’s attack but to weaken its armed forces so it cannot menace its neighbours again.
“We need this bill to support Ukraine in its fight for freedom,” Mr. Biden said. “It’s not cheap – but caving to aggression is going to be more costly.”
Mr. Zelensky thanked Mr. Biden and the American people in a tweet.
“We defend common values – democracy and freedom. We appreciate the help. Today it is needed more than ever!”
While the proposed U.S. aid amounts to more than 20 per cent of Ukraine’s 2020 GDP, the World Bank estimates the war will cut more than 45 per cent off Ukrainian GDP this year and hit growth elsewhere around the world.
President Vladimir Putin this week threatened unspecified retaliation for Western arms deliveries to Ukraine, while his foreign minister, Mr. Lavrov, warned of a threat of nuclear war. Mr. Lavrov said on Friday that Russia did not consider itself to be at war with NATO, a step back from earlier comments.
As the war in Ukraine continues, much of the port city of Mariupol lies in ruins and aid agencies say thousands have perished. Those who have not managed to leave the city spoke to Reuters about the horrors they have endured. Rachel Judah has more.
Reuters
U.S.-backed broadcaster Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL), one of the main remaining Russian-language sources for news outside Kremlin control, said the body of producer Vira Hyrych had been found in part of a residential building destroyed by a missile.
“She was going to bed when a Russian ballistic missile hit her apartment in central Kyiv,” Ukrainian Foreign Ministry spokesperson Oleg Nikolenko said. “Russia’s barbarism is incomprehensible.”
Russia’s defence ministry said its high-precision, long-range missiles had destroyed the production facilities of a rocket plant in Kyiv. A U.S. official confirmed the attack had targeted military production, without saying if the target was destroyed.
Russia said earlier a diesel submarine in the Black Sea had struck military targets with Kalibr cruise missiles, the first reported such strikes from a submarine.
The bloodiest fighting and worst humanitarian catastrophe of the war have been in Mariupol, an eastern port reduced to a wasteland by two months of Russian bombardment and siege.
Ukraine says 100,000 civilians remain in the city, which is mostly occupied by Russia.
In parts of Mariupol now held by Russian troops, emergency workers were gathering up bodies from the streets. Residents among the blasted ruins recounted the horror they had survived.
“We were hungry, the child was crying when the Grad (multiple rocket launcher) shells were striking near the house. We were thinking, this is it, the end. It can’t be described,” Viktoria Nikolayeva, 54, who survived the battle with her family in a basement, told Reuters, weeping.
UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres on April 28 toured the Kyiv region towns of Borodyanka and Bucha that were shelled and occupied during Russia's offensive in northern Ukraine before it withdrew to focus on the east.
Reuters
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Province Sees Another Significant Increase in Fuel Prices – VOCM

Another significant increase today, pushing many fuel prices well over thresholds many people never thought they’d see, and with more increases tomorrow as new carbon tax rates come into effect.
Diesel on the island is up another 17 cents a litre while diesel in Labrador is up by 18 cents. That brings the price of diesel even closer to the $3.00 a litre mark on the island and pushing the price over $3.00 a litre in some parts of Labrador.
Furnace oil is up by close to 15 cents a litre. That brings the price of furnace oil to over $2.00 a litre.
Stove oil has also seen a double-digit increase— 14.62 cents on the island and 15.64 cents in Labrador.
Meanwhile, another increase is expected tomorrow with the introduction of a new carbon tax rate on gasoline and diesel fuels in all parts of the province. Gasoline will see a 2.6 cent a litre increase as of midnight tonight, while diesel will see another increase of 3.1 cents in carbon taxes.
That brings the total carbon tax on gasoline to 11.05 cents per litre, and 13.41 cents for diesel.

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Musk sells $8.5bn worth of Tesla stock days after Twitter deal – Al Jazeera English

The Tesla CEO offloaded 9.4 million shares this week, according to regulatory filings.
Elon Musk disclosed an additional $4.5 billion worth of Tesla Inc. stock sales in new regulatory filings Friday, bringing the total he’s disposed of in the wake of his deal to buy Twitter Inc. to more than $8.5 billion.
Tesla’s chief executive officer offloaded more than 5 million shares on April 28, according to the new filings. Those followed disclosures late Thursday of sales totaling 4.4 million shares the two prior days.
Musk has now sold about $25 billion worth of stock in the electric-car maker during the last six months.
No further TSLA sales planned after today
— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) April 29, 2022
The world’s wealthiest man reached an agreement on April 25 to acquire Twitter for $44 billion using a financing plan that’s alarmed some Tesla investors. In addition to pledging tens of billions of dollars worth of his Tesla shares to support margin loans, Musk has vowed to line up some $21 billion worth of equity. It’s been unclear how much of that would come from selling a portion of his Tesla stake.
The latest disclosures come after Musk tweeted Thursday that he has “no further Tesla sales planned after today.” He still has time to file more Form 4s disclosing additional sales if more took place on Thursday.
Tesla shares climbed 4.9% to $920.29 as of 10:25 a.m. Friday in New York, paring this week’s steep decline.
The Twitter deal is poised to be one of the biggest leveraged buyouts in history, with Musk arranging $25.5 billion of debt and margin-loan financing from lenders including Morgan Stanley. If it were to fall apart, the party breaking up the agreement would be required to pay a termination fee of $1 billion, under certain circumstances.
Musk’s pursuit of Twitter has once again highlighted the extent to which Tesla’s valuation hinges on how involved and invested its CEO is in the business. He has headed the company since 2008 and long been its biggest shareholder.
Tesla’s stock slumped late last year as Musk offloaded more than $16 billion worth of shares, his first sales in more than five years. The disposals started in November after Musk polled Twitter users on whether he should trim his stake.
With a $252.2 billion fortune, Musk is the world’s richest person, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. The recent slump in Tesla shares has shaved $18 billion off his net worth this year, even as the carmaker has reported better-than-expected earnings and opened new plants in Germany and Texas.
(Updates with additional context beginning in the seventh paragraph.)
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Canada liver disease in kids: The facts so far – CTV News

Since early April, health officials around the world have been on alert for healthy, young children suddenly developing severe cases of hepatitis with no known cause.
According to the latest estimates by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO), there are at least 194 probable and confirmed cases reported around the world, excluding an unknown number of potential cases in Canada.
Here is what we know so far about these cases.
Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. The organ can become damaged or inflamed as a result of a virus, heavy alcohol consumption, toxins, some medications or another health condition. The liver serves numerous essential functions and acts like a filter for the blood that leaves the stomach and intestines. It regulates chemical levels in the blood, creates nutrients, carries away waste, helps fight infections and more.
Acute hepatitis is when the liver function is impaired for less than six months. Chronic hepatitis is when the inflammation lasts longer. Some cases of hepatitis can be severe – even fatal – if left untreated. Other cases can be mild and require no treatment.
What makes these cases of acute hepatitis unusual is that doctors have not determined their cause.
Medical officials have said that a number of cases began with gastrointestinal symptoms such as stomach pains, diarrhea and vomiting. The children later exhibited signs of jaundice, where the skin and whites around the eyes turn yellow. Jaundice is an indication that something is wrong with the liver, and medical advice should be sought immediately.
Other common symptoms of hepatitis include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, dark urine, light-coloured stools and joint pain.
Dr. Deirdre Kelly, professor of paediatric hepatology at the University of Birmingham, told CTV News on Tuesday that the majority of children have spontaneously recovered.
“While this is a serious disease if their child develops it, the chances are they will recover on their own,” she said.
Based on numbers compiled by the ECDC in a report on April 28 and the WHO on April 23, there are at least 194 cases so far of hepatitis with no known cause in countries including the U.K., Spain, Israel, the U.S., Denmark, Ireland, the Netherlands, Italy, Norway and France.
As of April 21, 114 cases were from the U.K., according to the WHO. As of April 27, there were “approximately 55 probable and confirmed cases” from a dozen countries within the European Union and European Economic Area, 12 cases from the U.S., and another 12 out of Israel,” the ECDC said. Japan has reported one case.
“The severe hepatitis for which there is no cause, we rarely see more than about 20, 25 max in the whole year. And we’ve seen 114 in the first three to four months of this year,” Kelly said.
“These are perfectly normal children. They’ve got no comorbidities and no other infections and they’re developing severe hepatitis, of which 10 per cent have required liver transplantation.”
The 10 per cent figure is based on an earlier tally of cases from the WHO on April 23 that found 17 children required a liver transplant. One child in Britain reportedly died.
The hepatitis cases involve children between the ages of one month and 16 years, health agencies have said, with the majority occurring in young children between the ages of two and five.
Scotland’s public health agency was the first to raise the alarm about these unusual hepatitis cases in early April, after one child became sick in January and nine others in March. All were severely ill and had to be taken to the hospital where they were diagnosed with hepatitis.
The majority of similar U.S. cases were found in nine previously healthy children between the ages of one and six from Alabama. Two of the children reportedly required liver transplants. Five children with significant liver injury of unknown origin, including some experiencing acute liver failure, were admitted at a children’s hospital in Alabama as early as October 2021.
Two additional severe cases were also flagged in North Carolina and three in Illinois, with local media reporting that one resulted in a liver transplant and two others being placed on a transplant list.
While there are no confirmed cases in Canada, the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) had previously told CTV News that it was “aware of reports of severe acute hepatitis of unknown origin in young children in Canada.”
“[PHAC] is working with its international partners as well as provincial and territorial partners to gather information on this evolving situation,” the agency told CTV News in an email statement on Friday.
“Potential cases in Canada are being investigated further to determine if they are related to cases in the United Kingdom and the United States.”
Health authorities are investigating a number of possible causes for these hepatitis cases. So far, the WHO has ruled out the viruses that cause hepatitis A, B, C, D and E, based on laboratory testing.
While toxin exposure is another consideration, experts believe this is less likely due to the cases being documented in different countries. Health authorities have also not found any links to international travel among the cases either.
Currently, investigations suggest a link to an adenovirus, according to the WHO and ECDC. Adenoviruses make up a large family of viruses that can spread from person to person, causing a range of illnesses including colds, pinkeye and gastroenteritis. Officials say there has been a recent rise in adenovirus infections, particularly in the U.K.
Close to half of the hepatitis cases, including those in Alabama, have been tied to an adenovirus, with lab tests indicating some children were infected with type 41, which is associated with gastroenteritis, causing diarrhea and vomiting. At least 19 cases also involved a SARS-CoV-2 co-infection.
“While adenovirus is currently one hypothesis as the underlying cause, it does not fully explain the severity of the clinical picture,” the WHO said in its April 23 report. The health agency noted this particular virus has not previously been tied to hepatitis, adding that it is a common pathogen that usually causes self-limited infections.
COVID-19 is also being considered, although a number of the cases did not involve a previously known infection.
“We don’t really know the causes yet and COVID may be implicated in some cases,” Dr. Simon Taylor-Robinson, a professor and liver researcher at London’s Imperial College, previously told CTV’s Your Morning.
“In fact, we know COVID can cause inflammation in any part of the body, not just the lungs.”
Another theory being considered is that children’s immune systems, weakened during pandemic lockdowns and distancing, may be more vulnerable to other diseases.
It is also possible that two viruses working “in concert” with each other could also be behind the hepatitis cases, some health experts say. Researchers are also exploring the possibility that the adenovirus may have mutated.
Despite disinformation being spread on social media suggesting a link between the hepatitis cases and COVID-19 vaccinations, health authorities have definitively ruled out COVID-19 vaccinations as a potential cause because they say the vast majority of cases involve children who are too young to be eligible for vaccinations.
“None of the currently confirmed cases in the U.K. has been vaccinated,” a representative of the U.K. Health Security Agency told Reuters. “There is no link to the COVID-19 vaccine.”
Adenoviruses are spread through close personal contact like touching, through the air by coughing and sneezing, or by touching contaminated objects and surfaces and then touching areas of the face before washing your hands. In some cases, it can also spread through an infected person’s stool, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Everyday measures, such as hand washing and general good hygiene measures, along with those adopted during the pandemic should help, experts say, adding that suddenly developing a severe case of hepatitis with no known cause is still rare despite the current global cases.
“They should (be) reassured it’s relatively unusual in normal children, and good hand hygiene as we’ve all been used to in the COVID pandemic, and good general hygiene in the home should be sufficient," according to Kelly.
With files from CTV National News reporter Vanessa Lee, Reuters, and The Associated Press
The federal Liberals and New Democrats have finalized an agreement that, if maintained, would keep Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's government in power until June 2025, in exchange for progress on longstanding NDP priorities. Trudeau announced Tuesday morning that the confidence-and-supply agreement has been brokered, and is effective immediately.
With Sept. 10 picked as the date for when the Conservative Party of Canada will have a new leader, time is ticking for prospective candidates and their teams to get into place. Those running have until April 19 to throw their hat into the ring and until June 3 to sell memberships.
From top politicians to influential oligarchs and media figures, Canada has slapped sanctions on numerous high-profile Russians, including President Vladimir Putin, as he continues his unjustified and deadly attack on Ukraine. CTVNews.ca has dug through the names to figure out who is who on Canada's growing sanctions list.
Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky made direct pleas to Canada to further assist his country in its fight against the ongoing Russian attacks during his straightforward and emotional address to Parliament on Tuesday. Appearing virtually, donning an army green sweater, Zelensky implored members of the House and Senate as well as the top officials and special guests present to witness his remarks for further urgent assistance.
For the first time in Canadian history, the federal government is enacting the Emergencies Act to bring the ongoing trucker convoy protests and blockades to an end.
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Conservative leadership frontrunner Pierre Poilievre is attracting big crowds to large halls in unlikely locations. And if his early romp lasts, he'll be impossible to beat, writes Don Martin in an exclusive opinion column for CTVNews.ca.

The sorry state of the race to become Canada’s Official Opposition Leader, traditionally a launch pad to the prime minister’s title, is antagonistically personal to a level I’ve never seen before, writes Don Martin in an exclusive opinion column for CTVNews.ca.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau runs a government that excels at being predictably inconsistent, transparently delusional, occasionally devious and excessively obsessed with the latest shiny object, Don Martin writes in an exclusive column for CTVNews.ca.

The not-quite-a-coalition deal is, first and foremost, a smart power preservation move by Prime Minister Trudeau, Don Martin writes in an exclusive column for CTVNews.ca.

Evan Solomon talks to people and players who dominate the political scene
CTVNews.ca’s Michael Stittle and Nanos Research’s Nik Nanos delve into the opinions of Canadians
Evan Solomon hosts Canada’s top weekly Sunday morning political program
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